Interview with lighting designer

Arne Fiedler

 

By Verbatim - December, 21 2018  

Verbatim is launching the « Indirect Downlight », the new elegant indirect downlight with exceptional visual comfort: ultra-low UGR<6. The luminaire was introduced to the public at the biennial Light + Building exhibition in Frankfurt, which took place in March 2018. Light + Building is the world’s largest fair for lighting and building-services technology. The «Indirect Downlight» features a unique design that emits light indirectly by first directing it into the reflector creating uniform and ultra-low glare illumination. The unique lighting technology has been designed by German product designer specialised in lighting, Arne Fiedler, recognized in the lighting industry, in collaboration with Mitsubishi Chemical’s R&D team.

The specially designed reflector provides excellent glare control, and the unique heatsink allows an ideal cooling and an extended lifetime. The result is a brilliant looking, high-quality designed luminaire. This heatsink technology has also been used for the other luminaire, the Verbatim “Trumpet” Downlight.

 

 


Verbatim recently had the pleasure to interview Arne Fiedler in his workshop in Walluf, Germany, where we found the expert passionate about the design of luminaires. This is the place where everything takes place: ideas are born and creativity is converted into prototypes.
 

 

What attracted you to the lighting design industry?

The specially designed reflector provides excellent glare control, and the unique heatsink allows an ideal cooling and an extended lifetime. The result is a brilliant looking, high-quality designed luminaire. This heatsink technology has also been used for the other luminaire, the Verbatim “Trumpet” Downlight.

My everyday goal is to create lighting solutions to solve important customer problems. Customers come to me with a specific project in mind and I translate this idea into a real product and provide a solution!

I love developing the product from scratch, it is a bit like a Lego® construction. From conceptualisation to reality, I am designing, developing, defining the tools, producing the product prototypes until it is launched in the market. The biggest challenge is to create something simple yet functional and beautiful.


What fascinates you about light? What makes light magical to you?

Light has extraordinary power to create emotion from the moment the luminaire is installed and we flip the switch: “light is not visible, it makes visible”.

 

From where do you draw your inspiration?

Keeping my eyes wide open is a true source of inspiration - listening, traveling, and staying awake and to be open to anything that arises.

One of my biggest hobbies is robotics and Lego® construction. This stimulate the brain and enhance creativity. I love creating toys with my kids. Sorting through piles of bricks, selecting appropriate parts, correctly assembling and stacking is actually an achievement in the field of robotics, which is really similar to the lighting design industry. There are infinite configurations and limitless possibilities but most important is that in the end the luminaire meets the technical requirements and solves the customer’s problem.

 

What are the major recent trends in lighting design, and how are they impacting lighting needs?

Printed circuit boards, or PCBs, are everywhere in our technology-based society. Everything from computers to telecommunications and lighting contains PCBs in one form or another. The company which will be able to combine multiple technologies around the building such as sensing technologies, heating control, smoke detector and lighting system will be the king, it is just a question of time. It is all about interconnected systems.

We have to think differently when installing a lighting system in a building, it is not only a source of light, but we also need to think of it as entity, as a whole system, including driver, reflector, all done in one circuit board.

 

Indirect and Trumpet Downlights are an exciting new development. Where did the idea come from and was the biggest challenge in developing this downlight concept?

The biggest challenge in designing the Indirect and Trumpet Downlight was the combination of high thermal performance with a high aesthetic value. In addition, this had to perfectly fit with the optics developed by Mitsubishi Chemical’s R&D team in Japan.

With regards to the heatsink, I had to ensure that the design met two goals: good thermal conduction and strong thermal convection of the surface. Here, the key was the optimal spacing between the individual fins and the optimization of the surface area to minimize the use of material and to allow sufficient thermal conduction, mechanical stability and moulding capabilities.

The fruitful collaboration with Mitsubishi Chemical’s R&D team resulted in a product that meets market needs providing excellent visual comfort.

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